Students are learning computer programming and earning college credits thanks to a new career pathway program at Portsmouth High School.

Students are learning computer programming and earning college credits thanks to a new career pathway program at Portsmouth High School.

Education and Career Pathways

Students are learning computer programming and earning college credits thanks to a new career pathway program at Portsmouth High School.

 

GOAL: All kids get the education and training they need to thrive in the workplace

 

Why it matters

Reece Carolan and Jeffrey Pitts have the chance to earn 12 computer science credits from Great Bay Community College — without leaving their high school.

Both are Portsmouth High School students planning to study computer science in college.

They are participating in a brand-new computer science pathway program. The 12 credits students earn while in high school — taught by Great Bay faculty and offered at a minimal fee — can be applied to a 24-credit certificate program in computer programming or a 34-credit certificate in software development. Those credits can then apply toward a 67-credit associate degree in computer technologies.

An agreement is in the works to allow those credits to transfer to a degree in computer science at the University of New Hampshire in Manchester. Other colleges will also accept the credits. Students could potentially start work after earning the certificate, and then take advantage of an employer’s tuition reimbursement program to complete their degrees.

The Foundation helped launch this and other pathways throughout the state to help students get the education they need — and help build the workforce of tomorrow.

Our economy increasingly demands higher skill levels.

 

 

New Hampshire ranks 49th in the nation for the number of STEM credentials awarded compared with the number of employees needed.

 

New Hampshire employers — particularly in high-tech fields — are having trouble filling jobs and are deeply worried about the future of our workforce. Demographic trends point to a decrease in the state’s working-age population while available jobs are projected to increase.

Jobs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) present some of the greatest opportunity. Demand for STEM workers is high and projected to remain so, but supply is low: New Hampshire ranks 49th in the nation for the number of STEM credentials awarded compared with the number of employees needed.

More than ever, our kids need help to afford higher education and training. Decades of tuition inflation coupled with low rates of state investment and stagnated federal aid mean New Hampshire students bear the highest debt load in the nation. Tomorrow’s teachers, business people, historians, musicians, engineers, doctors, plumbers and firefighters all need help to get the education they need to get good jobs in New Hampshire. Generous New Hampshire citizens who have created scholarship funds make it possible for the Foundation to award more than $5 million to New Hampshire students each year.

Together, we can help New Hampshire’s kids get the education they need to thrive and help create a skilled workforce so our businesses can succeed and grow. And we can help make sure that all of our kids have the opportunity to become adults who sustain and strengthen New Hampshire communities tomorrow.

We’re working to:

  • Provide scholarships to the most talented students in need.
  • Align student aid with New Hampshire’s workforce needs and best-paying careers, including those requiring certificates and two-year degrees.
  • Invest in effective pathways to work, including dual-enrollment programs and apprenticeships.
  • Advance the state’s goal of 65 percent of New Hampshire adults having post-secondary degrees or credentials by 2025.

Each of these goals is dependent on the dedicated work, collaboration and commitment of scores of partners. Please see list below.

 

We're here to help

To learn more about ways to help New Hampshire's kids thrive, contact:

Katie Merrow
  • Katie Merrow
  • Vice President of Community Impact
Judy Burrows
  • Judy Burrows
  • Director of Student Aid