Barbara Couch of Hypertherm, at the company's own technical training institute for its employees. Upon successful completion, employees can earn 28 credits at River Valley Community College. Photo by Cheryl Senter.

Barbara Couch of Hypertherm, at the company's own technical training institute for its employees. Upon successful completion, employees can earn 28 credits at River Valley Community College. Photo by Cheryl Senter.

Smarter Pathways

Building tomorrow's workforce

We’re bringing state leaders together to prepare New Hampshire students for the workforce of tomorrow.

New Hampshire is projected to have a net gain in jobs of 10 percent by 2022.

Many of those will be well-paying jobs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

But demographic trends point to a shrinking workforce.

Employers are already having trouble finding workers to fill STEM jobs.

The Foundation is working with state leaders in business, education, government and the nonprofit sector to strengthen pathways from school to jobs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

We are working in tandem with Governor Maggie Hassan’s Task Force on STEM Education and the New Hampshire Department of Resources and Economic Development, Department of Education and the state’s university and community college systems.

 

What we’re doing

  • The Foundation has increased scholarship support for students studying in STEM fields, awarding more than $1.2 million in STEM scholarships last year.
  • Investing in alternative pathways to work, including certificates, apprenticeships, and two-year degrees.
  • Collaborating to create pathways in computer science and IT and to fill existing pathways in advanced manufacturing.
  • Working to increase student enrollment in high school Career and Technical Education centers, funding the development of and tuition for dual-credit courses that put students on a pathway to STEM degrees at community colleges.
  • Advancing the goal of the state’s public colleges to increase STEM graduates by 50 percent by 2020, and double that number by 2025; and increase percentage of residents who hold a college degree, certificate or industry credential from 46 to 65 percent by 2025.

 


 

A recent Foundation study showed that interest and proficiency in math and science diminish dramatically as New Hampshire students progress through school.

PDF-icon    Read the New Hampshire STEM Pipeline report (PDF)

 


 

 

Business Leaders Support Smarter Pathways

These leading New Hampshire businesses are sponsoring the Smarter Pathways initiative:

Albany International
(Rochester)

Hypertherm
(Hanover)

Hitchiner Manufacturing
(Milford)

Fidelity Investments
(Merrimack)

Dyn
(Manchester)

New Hampshire Ball Bearings
(Peterborough and Laconia)

Graphicast
(Jaffrey)



We're here to help

To learn more about how we're helping build a strong workforce for tomorrow, contact:

Katie Merrow
  • Katie Merrow
  • Vice President of Community Impact